How Do I Become a Canadian Citizen?

Applying for Canadian Citizenship

In order to apply for Canadian citizenship, you need to gather the appropriate documentation, complete the application forms and, in most cases, pass the citizenship test.

  1. Gather your documents
  2. Complete the application forms
  3. Pass the Citizenship Test
  4. Swear the Citizenship Oath
  5. Become a Canadian Citizen

 

Step 1 – Documentation

 

Canadian Status Documents

Immigration documents – These prove your status as a permanent resident of Canada. They include:

 

Language Requirements

This is necessary if you are 18 – 54 years of age. You have 3 options for submitting proof of language ability (English and/or French):

  1. Use an accepted third party test. These are:
    • CELPIP-G or CELPIP General-LS (do not take the academic version). Your score results must be Level 4 or higher for tests taken after April 1, 2014; or 2H or higher for tests taken before April 1, 2014.
    • IELTS General Training (do not take the academic version). Your score results must be 0 or higher in speaking and 4.5 or higher in listening.
    • TEF; you must have a score of B1, B2, C1, or C2 or higher. This is for tests taken after July 1, 2012.
  2. Give proof of successful completion of a secondary or post-secondary program in English or French. This can be in Canada or abroad. You will need to present:
    • Diploma or transcript from a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada or abroad showing you have successfully completed a program in English or French.
    • Diploma or certificate from a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada or abroad showing you have graduated from a program conducted in English or French.
  3. Give proof of having obtained a Canadian Languages Benchmark (CLB) level 4 or higher in speaking and listening skills, by means of a Canadian government-funded language training program. This includes the following programs:
    • Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC). If you completed the LINC course between January 1, 2008 and October 31, 2012; you may not have received a certificate. Indicate on the form by checking the box that you have successfully completed the course. If you have the certificate, include it with your documentation. If you completed the course on or later than November 1, 2012, you will have been automatically given a certificate. Include it in the documentation.
    • The Manitoba Canadian Language Benchmark Report.
    • The Manitoba Adult English as an Additional Language (AEL) Student Progress Report. Your speaking and listening skills should be Level 4C or higher.
    • British Columbia’s English Language Services for Adults (ELSA). If you took the training in 2008 or 2009, you may not have received a certificate. You must request one from ELSA directly. IRCC will not request it for you. You must have a score of CLB 4 or higher in listening or speaking. If you took the test in 2010 through August 31, 2014 then IRCC will accept a certificate with a language level CLB 4 or higher in listening and speaking. Since November 1, 2012 ELSA certificates automatically display a level of CLB 4 or higher. (IRCC will only accept courses in BC that are certified by the ELSA.)
    • Ontario Provincial Language Training Certificates, dating from December 2013, or later. They are issued by the Adult Non-Credit Language Training program, which is run by the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship, Immigration and International Trade (MCIIT). You must have a score of CLB 4 or higher in speaking and listening.
    • Saskatchewan Statement of Language Proficiency, given to English as an Additional Language (EAL) students. A level B1 is equivalent or higher than CLB 4.
    • Please note that if you are a resident of Canada, you can take these programs to upgrade your language skills and achieve the minimum required level of CLB 4.
    • If you are deaf, and unable to provide any of the proofs listed above (certificates etc.) then you may provide an audiogram issued by a Canadian audiologist, along with a letter signed by the same audiologist who is providing the audiogram.
    • If you have a cognitive or psychiatric or psychological disorder, disability, or condition that prevents you from providing upfront proof of language ability, you must provide supporting evidence to back up your claim. Without this supporting evidence, your application will be rejected.

Learn More

 

Identification Documentation

You need to provide documents that will provide your identity.

 

Biographical page of your passport(s) or travel documents:

Provide photocopies of the biographical page of your passport or travel document for the 6 years prior to the date of your application for citizenship, OR, since the date you became a permanent resident. Use whichever period is more recent. If you have had more than one passport during the time period, you will need to provide the pages from all passports held during the relevant period. The biographical page of your passport or travel document should have the following information:

  • Your name,
  • Your photograph,
  • Your passport/travel document’s document number,
  • The issue date,
  • The expiry date.

Provide photocopies of any renewal pages in your passport/travel document.

Attach written explanations for any gaps in the prior 6 years, or since you became a permanent resident, which are not covered by your passport/travel document(s). For example, if you were without a valid passport for a certain amount of time, explain why.

 

Personal IDs:

Provide a clear and legible photocopy of 2 pieces of personal identification. They must be photo ID, with a photo of yourself. Examples are:

  • Provincial Driver’s License
  • Provincial Health Insurance Card
  • Provincial Photo ID Card.
  • NOTE: SIN cards, Bank cards, and Credit cards are NOT acceptable.

 

Police Certificates

For any country where you have lived for 6 months or longer during the 4 years prior to your application, include a Police Certificate from that country. Contact your local police station in that country for information on how to obtain one. Include the original copy of the police certificate.

 

Payment Receipt:

When you pay online you will be given a receipt to print out. You must enclose this receipt with your application.

 

Photographs:

You must include: 2 identical photographs – Go here for the specifications of the photograph and print the page out for your local photographer to follow. Follow the steps relating to photographs in your citizenship application form. Do NOT staple, fold, glue, or otherwise attach the photographs to your application.

Jump to “Apply”

 

Possible additional documents:

You may need to provide additional documentation depending on your particular circumstances. This can include:

All documents NOT in English or French must be accompanied by:

  • The translation in English or French, AND
  • An affidavit from the person who completed the translation, AND
  • A certified copy of the original document.

Name Change (if applicable):

There are several types of documents which are acceptable.

  • Name Changes Within Canada:
    • Legal change of name document issued by a province or territory;
    • Amended Birth Certificate;
    • Court Order specifying name changes;
    • Adoption order.
  • Name Changes Within Canada – Family Names Only:
    • Marriage Certificate;
    • Divorce Decree;
    • Registration or Declaration of Union issued by civil authorities;
    • Registration for Common-Law Relationship – in provinces that permit change of name under common-law relationships.
  • Name Changes Outside Canada – But currently residing in Canada:
    • Foreign passport or authoritative national document that shows the name change;
    • A document linking your old name to your new name – marriage certificate with official translation, for example;
    • A Canadian provincial or territorial document with your new name – driver’s license, health card, age of majority card, senior citizen’s ID card are examples.
  • Name Change Outside Canada – Currently residing abroad:
    • Foreign passport or authoritative national document that shows the name change;
    • A document linking your old name to your new name – marriage certificate with official translation, for example;
    • An authoritative national or state/provincial issued photo identity document that was issued by the country or state/province in which you are currently residing. It must show your new name.

 

Amended Record of Landing or Confirmation of Permanent Residence:

If you have applied and successfully obtained a name change due to immigration officials’ error when originally recording your name, include:

Date of Birth Correction (if applicable):

If your date of birth has been corrected on your immigration document (see above: Record of Landing or Confirmation of Permanent Residence or PR Card) you must provide a copy of:

 

Date of Birth Correction by Court Order:

If your date of birth has been corrected by a provincial/territorial court order, you must provide a copy of:

  • Provincial/Territorial Court Order changing your date of birth, AND
  • The completed questionnaire: Request to Correct a Date of Birth for Citizenship (CIT 0464). Go here for the questionnaire.
  • PLEASE NOTE: Once your application for citizenship has been submitted you CANNOT request a change in your date of birth.

Step 2: Completing the Application Forms

In order to apply, you must complete the following forms:

Completing the CIT0002 Citizenship Application

Remember that any incomplete sections of the application form can mean that the form is returned to you for completion. This will result in substantial delays which can be avoided by carefully filling in all sections. If a section does NOT apply to you, write “Not Applicable” or “N/A.” Remember to carefully read each question before answering. Here are suggestions for your answers, based on the question numbers on the form.

    1. Language of Service: If you want to get service in French, you should apply using the French version of the application.
    2. I have special needs that require accommodation: These are things like
      • Wheelchair access is required.
      • Personal assistance: Seeing-eye dog, interpreter, care attendant etc.
      • Sign language interpretation (for speaking & listening part of interview).
      • Visually impaired requiring enlarged print study guide, braille, or audio versions.
  1. I have applied for Canadian citizenship before: Remember to write the year you previously applied for Canadian citizenship, if this is your second time applying.
    1. Name (exactly as it is shown on my immigration document): Remember to write your last name exactly as it appears on your immigration document. Your immigration document is generally one of the following
      • Record of Landing (IMM 1000)
      • Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292, or IMM 5688)
      • Permanent Resident Card (PR card)
      • If your name was shortened, write the version of your last name that appears in the “Remarks” section of your immigration document. This is the version that will take precedence over your last name in the family name section.
    2. Request for a different name to appear on certificate and please indicate/select reason below: Note that this request may or may not be accepted.
      • Truncated (shortened) name on immigration document – Explain what happened in a written statement
      • Legal name changeSee above
      • Minor change in spelling – Explain why in a written statement
      • Significant change in spelling – Explain why in a written statement.
    3. List any other names used including name at birth, maiden name, previous married name(s), aliases and nicknames. These names will not appear on your citizenship certificate: See above for the acceptable types of proof.
    1. Birth details as shown on my immigration document:
      • Date – This must be the date on your immigration document; if that date is wrong, you need to amend your immigration document before applying for citizenship
      • Place – Again, this must match your immigration document
    2. Personal information:
      • Sex – The application form currently only accepts male and female
      • Height – List your heigh in either metric or imperial, but whatever format you choose, it should match your immigration document
      • Colour of eyes – It should match your immigration document
      • Marital status
        • Never married – You have never been married at any time
        • Married – If you have married since you became a Permanent Resident and changed your name, you may need to provide proof of a legal name change
        • Common-law – Check this box only if you are in a common law relationship which you have declared
        • Widowed – If your spouse has died since you landed, and you have changed your name as a result, you may need to provide proof of a legal name change
        • Divorced – If you have divorced since you became a Permanent Resident and changed your name, you may need to provide proof of a legal name change
        • Legally separated – Check this box only if you are not yet legally divorced but have filed a separation agreement.
    1. Home address: This is your permanent address in Canada
      • No. and street – The street number and street on which you live in Canada
      • Apt. No. – Complete this field only if you live in an apartment or condo
      • City/Village – The city, town, village or other form of municipality you live in
      • Province – The province or territory you reside in
      • Country – Canada
      • Postal Code – In A1B23C format
    2. Mailing address (if different from home address): Complete this question only if your mailing address is different from your home address.
    3. Telephone number(s):
      • Home – Your home number including area code (10 digits)
      • Work – Your work number including area code and extension, if applicable
      • Cell – Your cellular/mobile number (10 digits) – this is important in case IRCC needs to get a hold of you for some reason
    4. I have lived at my home address: Put the date that you moved in to your current house or apartment; if you are a student and are currently living away from home temporarily, put the address you reside at permanently
    5. Email address, if applicable: It is important that you enter an email address you check regularly as this will be the primary mode with which IRCC corresponds if they need additional documentation
    1. Date you became a permanent resident (landed immigrant)? To find the date you became a permanent resident, look at:
      • Box 45 on your IMM 1000 Record of Landing, OR
      • Box 45 on your IMM 5292 Confirmation of Permanent Residence, OR
      • Personal Information section on your IMM 5688 Confirmation of Personal Residence, OR
      • Back of your PR Card.
    2. When did you first come to live in Canada if different from “A”? Enter a date in this field only if you landed as a temporary resident before landing as a permanent resident (i.e. you held a visitor visa, work permit and/or study permit and then became a permanent resident).
    3. List all countries of which you are a citizen. You must include photocopies of the biographical pages of any passports from the countries: If you are a citizen of more than one country, you will have to provide the biographical pages of every passport you are a citizen of.
    4. Do you have permanent resident status or the equivalent in any country other than Canada?
      • No – Most people check will need to this box
      • Yes – Only check this box if you have permanent resident status (not citizenship) in a country other than Canada, such as the United States, and list the date you became a permanent resident of this or these countries
    5. Addresses in the past six (6) years immediately before the date of your application or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is more recent (List all your Canadian and overseas addresses in the relevant period, including the postal codes. If you were residing, employed or attending school outside Canada during this time, you must also indicate all your foreign addresses. Do not exclude any period of time during the relevant period: List ALL the addresses that you have resided at in Canada in the 6 years prior to the date of your application for citizenship. Note the bold text on the form above the fields: “Do not exclude any period of time during the relevant period.” If you omit information here, you might receive the Residence Questionnaire.
    6. Work and education history in the six (6) years immediately before the date of your application or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is more recent: List ALL your work/education experience in Canada in the past 6 years. If you were NOT employed and NOT studying during any period in the past 6 years, you must indicate this and show the time in which you were not employed or studying with a brief reason (homemaker, unemployed, retired, volunteer etc.). If this section does not account for EVERY month of the past 6 years, your application will not be accepted: If you omit information in this section, your appliction will most likely be rejected without you being given the opportunity to fill in the gaps.
      1. Have you worked in the relevant period? – Check “Yes” if you worked and “No” if you didn’t but if you check “No” be sure to list what you were doing in the fields below
      2. Have you attended an educational institution or participated in English/French language training in the relevant period? – You will need to provide proof of this if you answer “Yes” and you will need to check the appropriate box in question 7A. (Learn more about the language requirements.)

      If you answered yes to questions A and/or B, list your work and/or education history (inside and outside Canada) in the relevant period, including the city and country, starting with your most recent. If you were not employed (i.e. you were unemployed, retired, homemaker, etc.) you must indicate the reason for being unemployed and confirm the dates of your unemployment under “Work/Education” and indicate the time period. Do not exclude any period of time during the relevant period. Do not leave this section blank. If you do, your application will be returned to you. If you need more space, use an additional sheet of paper. Follow these instructions to the letter.

    7. Minor children’s education history in the six (6) years immediately before the date of your application or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is more recent (if applicable). (Complete the information below for all children who were under the age of 18 in the six (6) years immediately before the date of your application or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is more recent, including those who are already Canadian citizens (if applicable). If you need more space, use an additional sheet of paper.
      NOTE: LISTING A MINOR CHILD’S SCHOOL ATTENDANCE IS NOT AN APPLICATION FOR CITIZENSHIP FOR THE CHILD. IF YOU WISH TO APPLY FOR YOUR CHILDREN, YOU MUST COMPLETE AN “APPLICATION FOR CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP – MINOR” FOR EACH CHILD (UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE).)
      As the text on the form indicates, you need to complete this section if you have children who were minors during the years you lived in Canada prior to applying and you need to complete their applications as well so they can become citizens.
    8. Income tax information: First, determine if you are required to file income taxes by going here. If you have filed taxes, indicate whether you used a:
      • SIN (Social Insurance Number) OR
      • TTN (Temporary Tax Number) OR
      • ITN (Individual Tax Number).

      Fill out the table for the prior 6 taxation years, and it is advised you consent to allow the CRA to share your tax information with IRCC (CIC). Remember, if you check BOX B, you are declaring that you do not have a SIN, or TTN, or ITN, and that you are not required to file personal income taxes for the past 6 years.

    9. Presence calculation: Use the online physical presence calculator at IRCC’s website or, if you have trouble with that, complete the How to Calculate Physical Presence form (CIT 0407) (see below).
    10. Residence outside Canada – In the six (6) years immediately before the date of your application, or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is most recent:
  1. Did you reside outside Canada with your Canadian spouse or common-law partner who was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, the federal public administration or the public service of a province, otherwise than as a locally engaged person? If “Yes,” you will have to provide proof of your relationship and their employment
  2. Were you employed outside Canada in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, the federal public administration or the public service of a province, otherwise than as a locally engaged person? If “Yes,” you will have to provide proof of your employment
  3. Did you reside outside Canada with your spouse, common-law partner, or parent who:
    • was a permanent resident, and
    • was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, the federal public administration or the public service of a province, otherwise than as a locally engaged person?

    This means that your spouse was not stationed abroad.

If you have answered yes to any of the above questions, complete the Residence outside Canada form (CIT 0177) and submit it with your application.

  • LANGUAGE EVIDENCE
    1. If you are 18 to 64 years of age you must submit acceptable proof that demonstrates that you have adequate knowledge of English or French. Please check the appropriate box to indicate which of the following forms of proof you are submitting with your application:
      • Results of a IRCC-approved third-party language test – The non-academic version of CELPIP or IELTS for the English language tests
      • Diploma, certificate or transcript of a secondary or post-secondary education completed in English or French, in Canada or abroad I.e. you answered “Yes” to question 6F – B. If you don’t have a diploma, but have a transcript that shows proof, check the box below.
      • Evidence of achieving CLB/NCLC 4 in a government-funded language training program: If you successfully completed LINC or CLIC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada), classes during the period from January 2008 to October 2012 but did not receive a certificate* (* IRCC has previously collected information about the results of your LINC or CLIC language training for statistical purpose but IRCC would like to obtain and use this information for purposes of verifying your language results. By signing the consent form section 9F of this application, you authorize IRCC to use the information that has been already collected to verify whether you have adequate knowledge of English of French.) – Only check “Yes” if you meet these very specific circumstances.
    2. I am deaf, which prevents me from submitting the proof of language described in 7A with my application. Note: If you check yes, you must submit supporting evidence with your application. Indicate if you are deaf and how this affects your ability to prove your language ability.
    3. I have a disorder, disability or condition that is cognitive, psychiatric or psychological in nature which prevents me from submitting proof of language with my application. Note: You must submit supporting evidence. Indicate if you have a disorder, disability, or condition that is cognitive, psychiatric, or psychological that affects your ability to prove your language ability. Supporting evidence includes but is not exclusive to letters from doctors.
  • PROHIBITIONS UNDER THE CITIZENSHIP ACT: If you answer “Yes” to any of the following questions, you will need to write an exlanation in the box provided or, preferably, on attached pieces of paper; be as detailed as possible
    1. Are you now or have you ever been in the six (6) years immediately before the date of your application, or since you became a permanent resident, whichever is most recent:
      • on probation in Canada? – “Probation” is an order from a court in Canada to do (or not do) a certain action (or actions) for a given of time; you should have been informed that you received a “Probation Order” and if you got a conditional discharge or suspended sentence you got a probation order
      • on parole in Canada? – According to the Parole Board of Canada, “Parole is…a conditional release, which allows some offenders to continue to serve the balance of their sentence outside of the institution.”
      • an inmate of a penitentiary, jail, reformatory, or prison in Canada? – Self explanatory
    2. Are you now serving a sentence outside Canada for an offence? – Self explanatory
    3. Are you now charged with, on trial for, or subject to or a party to an appeal relating to an offence under the Citizenship Act or an indictable offence in Canada? – An offense related to the Citizenship Act would be something such as “citizenship fraud,” where you misrepresented yourself to gain Canadian citizenship at a previous time; an “indictable” offence is the Canadian equivalent of a “felony” charge, i.e. a serious criminal offence that normally carries jail time
    4. Are you now charged with, on trial for, or subject to or a party to an appeal relating to an offence committed outside Canada? – This is regardless whether this is a minor or serious offence
    5. Are you now, or have you ever been, under a removal order (have you been asked by Canadian officials to leave Canada)? – Removal orders include “Departure Order” “Deportation Order” and “Exclusion Order”
    6. Are you now under investigation for, charged with, on trial for, subject to or a party to an appeal relating to or have you ever been convicted of a war crime or a crime against humanity? – Where ‘war crime’ means “an action carried out during the conduct of a war that violates accepted international rules of war” and ‘crime against humanity means “certain act(s) that is committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population or an identifiable part of a population.”
    7. In the past five (5) years, were you prohibited from being granted citizenship or taking the Oath of Citizenship because of misrepresentation or withholding material circumstances? – If you filed a previous application for citizenship and it was rejected because you withheld information or lied on your application, answer “Yes”
    8. In the past four (4) years, have you been convicted in Canada of an indictable offence under any Act of Parliament or an offence under the Citizenship Act? – This is essentially the same question as question 8C, only with regard to an actual conviction
    9. In the past four (4) years, have you been convicted outside Canada of an offence, regardless of whether you were pardoned or otherwise granted amnesty for the offence? – This is essentially the same question as question 8D, only with regard to an actual conviction
    10. While a permanent resident, have you:
      • been convicted in Canada of terrorism, high treason, treason, or spying offences? – Where
        • ‘Terrorism’ means “an act or omission undertaken “in whole or in part for a political, religious, or ideological purpose, objective or cause” that is intended to intimidate the public or compel a person, government or organization to do or refrain from doing any act, if the act or omission intentionally causes a specified serious harm. Specified harms include causing death or serious bodily harm, endangering life, causing a serious risk to health or safety, causing substantial property damage where it would also cause one of the above listed harms and, in certain circumstances, causing serious interference or disruption of an essential service, facility or system, whether public or private.”
        • ‘High Treason’ means “Every one commits high treason who, in Canada,
          1. kills or attempts to kill Her Majesty, or does her any bodily harm tending to death or destruction, maims or wounds her, or imprisons or restrains her;
          2. levies war against Canada or does any act preparatory thereto; or
          3. assists an enemy at war with Canada, or any armed forces against whom Canadian Forces are engaged in hostilities, whether or not a state of war exists between Canada and the country whose forces they are.”
        • ‘Treason’ means ” Every one commits treason who, in Canada,
          1. uses force or violence for the purpose of overthrowing the government of Canada or a province;
          2. without lawful authority, communicates or makes available to an agent of a state other than Canada, military or scientific information or any sketch, plan, model, article, note or document of a military or scientific character that he knows or ought to know may be used by that state for a purpose prejudicial to the safety or defence of Canada;
          3. conspires with any person to commit high treason or to do anything mentioned in paragraph (a);
          4. forms an intention to do anything that is high treason or that is mentioned in paragraph (a) and manifests that intention by an overt act; or
          5. conspires with any person to do anything mentioned in paragraph (b) or forms an intention to do anything mentioned in paragraph (b) and manifests that intention by an overt act.”
        • ‘Spying offence’ means spying on the Canadian government for another sovereign government
      • been convicted outside Canada of terrorism? – Which crimes constitute “terrorism” change from country to country
      • served as a member of an armed force of a country or organized armed group and that country or group engaged in armed conflict with Canada? – At the moment, this would mean Syria or Afghanistan
    11. In the past four (4) years, were you present in any country, other than Canada, for at least six (6) months (cumulative)? – Cumulative means “in total” so if you have resided or been present in any country other than Canada for 6 months or longer in the past 4 years, you will need a Police Certificate from that country.
  • CONSENT TO DISCLOSE PERSONAL INFORMATION Here you agree to let IRCC share your personal information with other parts of the Government of Canada
    1. CONGRATULATORY LETTER – If you select “Yes,” the MP of your riding will get basic information about you (detailed on the form) in order to mail you a congratulatory letter when you swear the Oath; there is no consequence for selecting “No”
    2. NATIONAL REGISTER OF ELECTORS – One of the benefits of becoming a citizen is voting in our elections, so you should select “Yes” here
    3. QUÉBEC’S PERMANENT LIST OF ELECTORS – This only has bearing if you live in Quebec, as Quebec handles its own municipal and provincial elections
    4. HISTORY OF ENTRIES TO CANADA – This one is important; if you select ‘Yes,’ IRCC will contact CBSA to verify your information provided; if you select “No” there is a chance that IRCC will reject your application because they cannot confirm your information (or they may request your permission at a later date)
    5. CANADA REVENUE AGENCY (Complete this section if you answered “YES” to Section 6, Question H)
      1. If you select “Yes” to the first statement, IRCC will contact CRA to verify that the tax information provided in 6H is correct, we strongly suggest answering “Yes” (if applicable) to avoid delays
      2. If you select “Yes” to the second statement, IRCCC will contact CRA to help verify your presence in Canada, we strong suggest answering “Yes” (if applicable) to avoid delays, especially if you denied IRCC permission to contact CBSA above
    6. LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION FOR NEWCOMERS TO CANADA (LINC) – Only answer ‘Yes’ to this question if you indicated that you are using your LINC results to meet the language requirement in question 7A
    7. INTENTION: I intend, if granted citizenship,
      • to continue to reside in Canada; – You do not intend to move overseas once you become a citizen
      • to enter into, or continue in, employment outside Canada in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, the federal public administration or the public service of a province, otherwise than as a locally engaged person; – This is only for people who are claiming to have met the residency requirements by employment by the Canadian or Provincial governments overseas
      • to reside with my spouse or common-l w partner, or parent, who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident and is employed outside Canada in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, the federal public administration or the public service of a province, otherwise than as a locally engaged person. – Again, this only applies to people who are claiming this is a reason they meet the residency requirement

      Note: If you select `no’, your application will be returned to you as you do not meet the requirements for a grant of citizenship. – Yes, this feels like an invitation to lie if you do intend to live outside of Canada at some point in the future. All we can say is DO NOT LIE ON YOUR CITIZENSHIP APPLICATION.

  • APPOINTMENT OF A REPRESENTATIVE – Only complete the IMM 5476 if you are applying through a representative, such as IMMIgroup
  • SIGNATURE OF APPLICANTM – Read everything carefully and ensure that you a) meet the requirements and b) have been completely honest. When you sign and date your application form, use the SAME SIGNATURE that you use on other official documents.

 

Proving You Meet the Physical Presence Requirement

IRCC now prefers you use their online calculator, so complete the calculator and print out and include the results of your online physical presence calculator, or include the print out for How to Calculate Physical Presence (Form CIT 0407) and submit it with your application. Go here to use a non-binding physical presence calculator to see if you qualify for citizenship.

Learn more

Residence Outside Canada CIT0177

You only need to complete and submit this form if you answered “Yes” to question 6J on the main application form. Learn how to complete this form.

 

Using a Representative

If you are using a Representative, include Form IMM 5476 – Use of a Representative.

 

Step 3: Pay the Fees

Detailed information on paying the Citizenship fees can be found here.

It costs CAD$630 for an adult to apply for Canadian Citizenship without the use of a representative. It costs CAD$100 for a minor’s application, provided they are under the age of 18 when the application is submitted.

 

Submitting the Application

Mail your application in a stamped, self-addressed envelope as follows:

sample-envelope

 

Courier Address

If you are mailing several applications at once (for family members), place them in the same envelope and use the total receipt for the total fee payment as shown above. This will ensure they are all processed together.

Please notify IRCC of any change of address during the application process.

Go here for help or contact the Help Centre.

Go here to check your application status.

Good luck!

 

Related Questions

 

What if I am missing some of the required documentation?

If you cannot prove you meet one or more of the requirements, your application may be refused, or it may be abandoned, or the IRCC officer may contact you to provide that documentation. In any case, it’s a bad idea to apply without all the documentation.

If you are missing Canadian status documents, Immigroup can help. Call us at 1-866-760-2623 for assistance.

If you are missing language documentation, you will either have to take an approved language test and wait for the results, or you will have to acquire the documentation from your previous country of residence (if applicable).

If you are missing identity documentation, you may need to contact the nearest Embassy of your home country to acquire that documentation.

A police certificate can be one of the most difficult documents to acquire. If you need help, contact us at 1-866-760-2623. We can help!

 

Can I leave a question on the application blank?

Unless the question clearly does not apply to you, you should not leave a question blank. Even if it doesn’t apply to you, you should write “Not Applicable.” However, most of the questions are going to apply to you and we don’t advise leaving any blank or even writing “Not Applicable” unless you are 100% sure that you should do that. If you do think you need to leave something blank, you should write an explanation and attach it to the application, in order to prevent delays.

 

Do I need to use a representative?

No, you do not. If you have a simple application, you are probably fine submitting the application yourself. However, if you have to submit lots of documentary evidence about your language skills or your trips abroad, or what have you, we strongly encourage you to hire a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant as you do not want to leave anything out and experience delays or have your application refused.

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